Collaborative Summer Library Program 2018 news

It’s never too early to being thinking about Summer Reading! That’s a good thing, because the roll out of Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP) 2018 has begun.

All CSLP materials have shipped

All CSLP 2018 manuals have been shipped to all public library directors in Indiana. If you are a librarian in charge of planning summer reading at your library, make sure you check in with your director in early December if they have not yet given it to you. The manual, which is on a flash drive, and other materials will arrive in a padded envelope. These envelops were primarily sent via InfoExpress, but a few were mailed via USPS or will be hand-delivered by your Indiana State Library (ISL) regional consultant.

Also of note: You can access the manual online this year! It is improved over last year with some additional search options. It can be reached via the CSLP website. Full instructions for accessing it can be found on the card included with the manual flash drive.

CSLP 2018 training opportunities

I’ve prepared a slate of trainings at libraries around the state so I can share information about the 2018 “Libraries Rock!” theme, artwork and manual. The training will include a roundtable discussion of program ideas for all ages. Please see the bottom of this post for a complete list of locations, including a newly-added location in southwest Indiana.

Can’t make it to an in-person training? No problem! There will be a set of webinars:

Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018
10 a.m. EST – CSLP 2018 Webinar – Early Literacy/School Age
2 p.m. EST – CSLP 2018 Webinar – Teen/Adult

Both webinars will be recorded and will be made available for viewing by the end of January.

Teen Video Challenge

The Indiana State Library and the Collaborative Summer Library Program are once again thrilled to announce our annual Teen Video Challenge!

What: A 30-to-90 second video, created by your 13-18 year old patrons, centered around their interpretation of the CSLP 2018 slogan “Libraries Rock!”

How: Start with these forms, found on ISL’s website:

When: Videos are due to me, via YouTube link, by 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018. All originals of the paperwork should be sent to me via InfoExpress or USPS and postmarked no later than Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018.

Why should we participate? Your teens will learn so much! They’ll gain technical skills like writing, planning, shooting and editing and they’ll learn incredibly important social and emotional skills like working in groups, communicating and thinking creatively. Plus, it’s fun!

Is there a prize? This year the creator of one Indiana entry will win $100 and the teen’s public library will receive a prize worth $50 from Upstart. Indiana entries competeonly against each other, which increases the chances of winning. Tell your teens about it today!

Complete list of CSLP in-person trainings

All trainings can be signed up for via ISL’s Events Calendar and all trainings are from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Eastern Time, unless otherwise noted.

Friday, Dec. 8, 2017
New Carlisle-Olive Township Public Library
408 S. Bray, New Carlisle, IN 46552

Friday, Dec. 15, 2017
Ohio Township Public Library – Bell Road Branch
4111 Lakeshore Dr, Newburgh, IN 47630
(Note: Newburgh is on Central Time; training will run 10 a.m.- 12 p.m. Central/11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Eastern)

Monday, Dec. 18, 2017
Huntington City-Township Public Library
255 W Park Dr, Huntington, IN 46750

Friday, Jan. 5, 2018
Madison-Jefferson County Public Library – Main Branch
420 West Main Street, Madison, IN 47250

Friday, Jan. 12, 2018
Washington Carnegie Public Library
300 West Main St., Washington, IN 47501

Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018
Johnson County Public Library – White River Branch
1664 Library Blvd., Greenwood, IN  46142

Friday, Jan. 26, 2018
Kokomo-Howard County Public Library – Main Branch
220 N. Union St., Kokomo IN 46901

Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018
Morrisson-Reeves Public Library
80 North 6th Street, Richmond, IN 47374

Monday, Feb. 26, 2018
Vigo County Public Library – Main Branch
One Library Square, Terre Haute, IN 47807

Friday, March 16, 2018
Pulaski County Public Library
121 S. Riverside Dr., Winamac, IN 46996

This blog post was written by Beth Yates, children’s consultant for the Indiana State Library.

The library as an incubator

There may have been a time when some might have scoffed at the idea of a library as a creator and not simply a neutral curator. Thankfully, that time is long past and one can take a look at public libraries across Indiana and see the visible change.

The most noticeable change in libraries has been physical. Many libraries across the state have already begun to renovate their spaces to accommodate more small meeting space and multi-use public space. Technology and electronic resources have also had a visible impact on these newly renovated physical spaces that serve not only as locations for learning and creative expression, but also as co-working spaces which blend commercial and creative output.

Here are just a few of the Hoosier public libraries who are promoting library creation and innovation:

Studio 304 Digital Media Lab | St. Joseph Co. Public Library

Studio 304 is equipped with tools and technology to create and produce in print, video and audio formats. The studio is designed for patrons 14 and older to inspire digital creativity.  The space features audio and video recording booths, as well as software and equipment for video and audio editing. The library even offers AV recording equipment for check-out for off-site use. Since opening, the space has been used to record a full length album and audio book. It’s relaxed atmosphere also makes it an ideal location for small meetings.

Digital Underground | Bartholomew County Public Library

The Digital Underground has given patrons access to a wide variety of digital creativity tools; tools that empower patrons to express their creativity in many different ways.  Record a song using the digital recording studio, create some album art using Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator and finish up by recording a music video using the green screen.  The sky is the limit as far as what you can do with the space and tools provided.

Level Up | Monroe County Public Library

Level Up is an all ages space that includes a video production studio with green screen, two audio production studios and digital creativity workstations for design, coding and editing. Level Up is a place for video and music production, graphic and web design and coding and game creation.

TekVenture | Allen County Public Library

TekVenture is somewhat special in that it was an independent organization before the Allen County Public Library gave it space to operate in a trailer, known as Maker Station, located across the street from the main library. Through this partnership, the makerspace was given a home to store equipment and tinker, and the library was provided access to members’ expertise and willingness to assist with programs. As this partnership grew, so did the organization and, even though their partnership continues to influence libraries across the globe, the organization has been housed in their own permanent downtown facility since 2015. When TekVenture was able to move to their own facility, Allen County Public Library was able to launch their own Maker Lab which is housed at the downtown branch. They also offer a satellite location at the Georgetown branch.

Haute Create | Vigo County Public Library

Haute Create is a dedicated space that offers access to state of the art technologies and innovative tools at the main branch of the Vigo County Public Library.

The space includes access to 3-D printers and a 3-D scanner; a wide-format printer; equipment for electronics and robotics work; a 75-inch SmartTV that allows for computers and software instruction for up to 12 people and other hardware and software tools which customers can use to create and explore.

The Portal | Tippecanoe County Public Library

Opened in 2012, Tippecanoe County Library’s Portal is a technology-rich center for learning, research, training, collaboration and content production. Visitors enjoy open space equipped with a combination of PCs, laptops and tablets. Patrons can use the space for digital creativity, or even as a co-working space.

The space also includes an audio/video conference suite, video recording equipment with green screen technology and equipment that allows one to preserve slides. Additionally, the Portal contains a language learning suite equipped with headphones and microphones for learning, listening and practicing foreign languages such as French, German and Japanese.

As libraries continue this trend, they will become synonymous with creation and innovation and not just curation. Indiana libraries are already well on their way.

This blog post was written by Amber Painter, southwest regional coordinator. For more information, contact the Professional Development Office (PDO) at (317) 232-3697 or via email.  

Professional conferences – There’s an app for that!

Professional conferences are a great way to refresh, get inspiration, meet new people and see new places and things. In graduate school I attended my first professional library conference and was totally lost. Which sessions should I attend? How do I figure out this big bulky book that has anything and everything I ever wanted to know about the conference in it? What is the exhibitor’s hall and why should I care? I was so overwhelmed! Twenty eight years later – conferences haven’t fundamentally changed.  You still need to bring the essentials: a sweater, refillable water bottle and comfortable shoes. But what is relatively new is the conference app! They are amazing! No more carrying that big bulky book or tearing out pages – yeah! This year’s ALA Annual Conference was my first time using a conference app.

With this app you could view exhibitor information, contact information and location of their booth, all easily accessible. It also included a floor plan of the exhibit floor. You could also browse the speakers, poster presenters and other attendees. Forget your business cards? No problem! Each attendees’ badge had a QR code so you could scan other attendees’ badges with their QR code when making connections. And you could also send messages to other app users. The app would also send alerts and updates for the conference right to the app.

Best of all, you could create a personal schedule by starring the sessions you planned to attend. You could see exactly what you want to attend, what time and where the session located. Having back up sessions starred was a must just in case the session you wanted to attend was full. Presenter’s slide presentations were also available on the app. You could draw on presentation slides, highlight text and take notes. It was even better if you had the conference app on a tablet or iPad.

The upcoming Indiana Library Federation Annual Conference on Nov. 13-15 also has an app. Search the Google Play or Apple App stores for “2017 ILF Annual Conference” to download this app. Like the ALA conference app, it also includes links to attendees, favorites, notes, schedule, speakers, sponsors, exhibitors, interactive map and more!

Want to learn how to get even more out of attending conferences? Be sure to sign up for this upcoming webinar: It’s Not Just Packing a Cardigan: How to Attend a Conference to Get the Most out of Your Experience on Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017 from 9:30 to 10:30 am, EST. No LEUs will be offered, but we still hope this is a great event to get ready for all the library conferences!

This blog post was written by Paula Newcom, northeast regional coordinator, Indiana State LibraryFor more information, contact the Professional Development Office at (317) 232-3697 or email.

The InLLA Leadership Toolkit

When you go to build something or make repairs, you grab a toolkit, right? Toolkits have the basic tools you need to accomplish your goal: Repairing or building things! When you need resources about management, leadership or both, where do you look? Library? Work? Friends? Now you can go into your Leadership Toolkit! This toolkit gives you the tools to help you become the best leader you can be.

The toolkit is the culmination of a project from the Indiana Library Leadership Academy (INLLA).

The Toolkit is free and contains resources such as books, articles and videos about leadership and how to improve or supplement current leadership skills. Have other ideas and resources that should go into the toolkit? Contact us and let us know. We can all lead from where we are; position or title is not a requirement for the toolkit. We look forward to see the growth of leaders in the Indiana library community! It’s time to build.

This blog post was written by Kimberly Brown-Harden, northwest regional coordinator, Indiana State Library. For more information, email Kim.

Switzerland County Public Library 100th anniversary celebration

Switzerland County Public Library celebrated their 100th anniversary on Saturday, July 29, 2017. The history of the library, as posted on their website:

Original petition to establish the library

“The Switzerland County Public Library was legally formed in 1915, after the state library law was passed, and it has its roots in many of the local literary societies which donated the first books, including the Methodist Church Lyceum, the Vevay Literary Society, the Julia L. Dumont Club, and the Working Men’s Institute.

The first library was located on the south side of Main Street, in a building owned by Mrs. Abner Dufour. She rented the facility to the library for $7 per month, partially furnished. The ladies of the library board were expected to be responsible for cleaning and decorating their new library. In 1917, the library board asked the county commissioners to make the library open and free to all taxpaying citizens of Switzerland County, making it the first countywide library system in the state of Indiana.

The library’s original reference desk

On November 13, 1917, the library received a letter from the Carnegie Corporation, informing them that the town of Vevay and Switzerland County would receive a sum of $12,500 for a new library building. A vacant lot on Ferry Street was purchased from Mrs. A .P. Dufour for $1000, and a contract to build the library was given to the Dunlap Company for $10,975. The new library building was completed and opened to the public on January 27, 1919. This was the last Carnegie library built in Indiana, and one of the last in the United States. Dr. L. H. Bear was the first person to obtain a library card, and Will H. Stevens was the first person to check out a book.

Current Director Shannon Phipps and former Director Lois Rosenberger

In 1991, the library and the Town of Vevay exchanged deeds, and in 1992, the former Carnegie library became the Town Hall and police station, and the new library opened across the street, in the former Market Square Park, at a cost of approximately $492,000. The money for the new building was granted by the Vevay/Switzerland foundation.”

Juggler Paul O. Kelly

The event was packed with fun programs throughout the day. Juggler Paul O. Kelly made an appearance from 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Happy Hooves Petting Zoo was in the library’s yard from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., musical group West of Dublin played in the library from 12-1 p.m. and Dan Bixler entertained the crowd with stories and music from 1:30-2:30 p.m. The event also included refreshments and an appearance from Lois Rosenberger, former director from 1969-1977 and 1979-1995. Louis was at the library when the current library building was built in 1992!

Musical group West of Dublin

Happy anniversary, Switzerland County Public Library!

This blog post was written by Courtney Allison, southeast regional coordinator, Indiana State Library. For more information, email Courtney at callison@library.in.gov.

Continuing education website gets a facelift

The Continuing Education portion of the Indiana State Library’s (ISL) website will be undergoing some changes soon. ISL’s Certification Program Director and Legal Consultant Cheri Harris and Professional Development Office Supervisor Suzanne Walker have been working through the website to identify instances where the same information is listed in multiple places, places where information does not match and pages that are confusing and wordy. “Our hope is to make the website more useful by making it easier to navigate,” Harris said. “In addition to streamlining the way the site is organized,” she added “we are also updating the language and content.”

The website will be updated gently in stages. A major overhaul to the archived webinar page has already been completed. The next phase will tackle the main menus and the initial landing pages and then more changes will spread out from there. The look of the site will mostly remain the same, but watch for a new menu for important forms, more ISL staff on the contact page and the changes to the Archived Webinar page.

“That’s what I’m most excited about,” Walker said. “Now people will have a much more visual experience with our archived webinars. They are now grouped by category with clickable tags to help the user find similar trainings. We have so many great trainings. We will easily hit fifty webinars this year. It is great that people can use the search box on the website to find them and the fact that they are now categorized and tagged makes it almost like a webinar database.”

Here’s a sample of what the old archived webinar page looked like:

Lots of text, arranged by date, with the newest webinars at the top and it linked out directly to YouTube.

Introducing, the new look:

Each webinar has a landing page where ISL can link to additional resources about the topic and each webinar has a category at the top of the block of text (Populations and Programming are shown here) that are color-coded and alphabetized.

Check back often to observe all of the updates.

Submitted by Suzanne Walker, supervisor of the Professional Development Office at the Indiana State Library and co-director of the Indiana Center for the Book.

Registration for book processing parties and round tables at the Indiana State Library now open

The Professional Development Office (PDO) of the Indiana State Library is thrilled to announce the addition of almost 20 new book club kits to their collection.

PDO is looking for volunteers to help process these kits so they will be ready for fall circulation. Processing mainly consists of applying book covers. PDO welcomes volunteers from both public and school libraries and no experience is required.

Two all-day sessions, on July 7 and July 27,  will be offered. The all-day events include the processing party, a round table discussion eligible for one LEU, provided lunch, snacks and a tour of the state library.

The July 7 round table topic will be: School & Public Library Partnerships/Book Clubs. Session is full.

The July 27 round table topic will be: Summer Reading Wrap-Up/Back-to-School/Book Clubs. Register here.

Parking is free. Contact Beth Yates, children’s consultant, via email or at (317) 234-5649 for more details.

This blog post was written by Beth Yates, children’s consultant for the Indiana State Library.

Fake news and how to fight it

Fake news feels like a modern scourge of intellect, but it’s nothing new. One of the earliest fake news examples on record dates to the first century, when Octavian, the adopted son of Julius Caesar, smeared the reputation of Mark Antony for control of the Roman Empire. Octavian, better known today as Emperor Augustus, read a will of dubious authenticity aloud to the Roman Senate. In that will, Mark Antony would give Roman lands to his children with Egyptian ruler Cleopatra and asked to be buried in an Egyptian tomb in the manner of a pharaoh. While the accuracy of this document can never be proven at this point, the fallout from Octavian’s act destroyed Mark Antony’s career and indirectly led to both his and Cleopatra’s deaths.

With over 2000 years of fake news, you would think that it would be easy to spot by now.  However, judging from the current news climate coupled with reports such as this 18-month study with middle and high school students, it appears we as a society need to strengthen our ability to identify and fight fake news as we see it. Luckily, there’s a lot of things we can do.

The first and easiest thing to do is to not spread fake news in the first place. Mad-Eye Moody said it best: Constant Vigilance. Fake news is often characterized by a number of traits which can help you spot it quickly. A few of these are:

  • It makes you angry, scared or, for some political stories, overly reassured
  • It seems too good (or bad!) to be true
  • It is not from a generally reputable source
  • It does not cite its sources, or uses poor sources to back its claims

You’ll see fake news on the Facebook pages of many of your friends, but just because they believe it doesn’t mean it’s true. Even the smartest, most-educated people will make mistakes and post fake news sometimes. It’s up to you to sniff it out.

Second, if you want to share something online, check it first. Let’s look at a claim like “Farmed salmon is bad for you.” The article that this claim is based on uses lots of inflammatory language, bright colors and statements meant to alarm you. But don’t be fooled. A quick Google search for “Is farmed salmon bad for you?” will turn up a link to the Washington State Department of Health which refutes virtually every claim in the other, negative article. If you look at the author of the negative article, you’ll learn that he’s not a doctor, dietitian or nutritionist, nor does he have a degree in any medical field. He’s an editor and CEO of a popular magazine, which gives him lots of publicity but no weight to his arguments. On the other hand, the Washington State Department of Health does not operate at a profit, employs scientists and provides excellent, credible sources for its claims in this article. Even though it’s wise to consider the safety of your food, bad information doesn’t help anyone.

Third, if you accidentally post fake news – and everyone does – apologize and take it down from your feed. Some fake news outlets can look astonishingly like real ones (like this one) and you may not think you have time to verify what you’re reading. It’s always best to double check, however, to keep yourself well-informed.

Here’s a quick checklist to verify an article’s claims:

  1. Where is it located? Good articles and videos come from good news sources.  What’s a good news source? Look for ones with strong codes or standards of ethics (like this one or this one) that clearly state their responsibilities to their writers, their sources and their readers. If you can’t find a standard or code of ethics, you will probably want to consider another news source. Other good sources of information are academic journals (which Indiana residents can find using INspire, the state library’s gateway to digital information access) and nonpartisan research organizations.
  2. Who wrote it? Look up the author using Google or LinkedIn, a professional networking site. Real news is written by real journalists, and you can often find pertinent information about them like resumes/CVs, other articles they’ve written and any other qualifications they may have, such as additional education or certifications.
  3. How old is it? Information, like fish, has an expiration date. Very often, old news is repackaged as current and articles without dates should be doubly suspect. Old news might rehash incidents or disputes that have since been resolved, or make you angry over something that is no longer true or applicable.
  4. Why was it written or developed? Fake news can be profitable – ask Jestin Coler, who registered a number of websites which produced fake news and made between $10,000 and $30,000 per month. Other reasons that fake news might be produced may be to sway political opinion, promote specific ideologies or beliefs or destroy a rival’s reputation.

Fake news may be everywhere, but you are smart enough to fight it. In addition to the above advice, I have developed a Fake News LibGuide with tools, tips, websites and other resources for you to use. You deserve honest, accurate information and you have every right to be mad that fake news outlets are trying to dupe you. Fight back with real news and real information. If you get stuck or lost, remember that the library is always there to help.

This blog post was written by KT Lowe, coordinator of library instruction and service learning at Indiana University East. You are welcome to contact her at lowekat@iu.edu or visit her on Facebook.

Innovation in library micro-grants from the Awesome Foundation

The Awesome Foundation is a worldwide community devoted to “forwarding the interest of awesome in the universe.” Created in 2009, the foundation distributes $1,000 grants, no strings attached, to projects and their creators.

Library Pipeline’s Innovation Committee has partnered with the Awesome Foundation to found an innovation in libraries chapter that will, each month, award a $1,000 micro-grant to a project that suggests creative solutions, proposes a new way of thinking about library services and supports under-served and diverse communities. Grant applications are due by the 15th of each month, with awardees announces by the first of the following month.

According to the Awesome Foundation, “The Awesome Innovation in Libraries Chapter was created by a small working group of passionate librarians within Library Pipeline who wanted to provide a catalyst for prototyping both technical and non-technical library innovations that embody the principles of diversity, inclusivity, creativity and risk-taking. Naturally, we embedded these principles into the grant selection guidelines. We are thankful for our dedicated team of trustees and sponsors who make this initiative possible.”

Award recipients are asked to report back publicly on what worked, what didn’t and what they learned, as well as to make the results of their efforts openly available to other to reuse in communities across the world.

To apply, submit your application on the Awesome Foundation website. Applications are constantly being accepted; please check the website details to confirm the next deadline.

This blog post was written by Amber Painter, southwest regional coordinator. For more information, contact the Professional Development Office (PDO) at (317) 232-3697 or email statewideservices@library.in.gov.  

Meet Fayette County Public Library’s new director, Betsy Slavens

Recently, Southeast Regional Coordinator Courtney Allison visited the Fayette County Public Library to chat with new director, Betsy Slavens. Betsy was the director at the Benton County Public Library before heading to Fayette County.

Are you from the area? If not, where are you from originally?
No. I am originally from Greenwood, Ind.

What inspired you to work in libraries?
I have always been a reader. When I was a child, my mom and dad would take me to two different library systems on alternating days because I could never get enough books. Even now, I always carry at least one book with me because I never know when I might get a spare minute. Working in a library seemed like a solid life choice.

What is your favorite thing about working for your library?
I love being the boss! No really. I really enjoy helping the staff meet their potential, advocating for the library in the community and helping library users discover something new and wonderful within our walls. I guess that’s actually three favorite things.

What is your favorite book?
That’s a hard question. So, I’m going to go with my top five desert island picks. I’d say, “Anne of Green Gables,” “A Wrinkle in Time,” “Special Topics in Calamity Physics” by Marisha Pessl, “A Confederacy of Dunces” by John Kennedy Toole and “Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932” by Francine Prose.

If you could have dinner with any three famous people in recorded history, who would they be and why?
Mr. Rogers because he was gentle, kind and thoughtful. I’m not sure what kind of dinner we’d have, but he was a vegetarian and I would like to respect that. I’d like to dish with Ernest Hemingway about cats over a couple of cocktails. Isn’t it fun to think of Ernest Hemingway going gaga over kitties? Jane Austen would be a hoot, too. We could go to the mall food court and people watch; it’d be a blast. I hope these are all individual dinner dates and not one big party.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not at work?
Besides reading, I enjoy going to food and beer festivals and taking road trips with my friends, travelling throughout Europe with my husband, watching British TV shows with my old man cat sitting on my lap, sewing, knitting, daydreaming and napping.

Welcome, Betsy!

This blog post was written by Courtney Allison, southeast regional coordinator, Indiana State Library. For more information, email Courtney at callison@library.in.gov.